Applying to Medical School: Why it’s Important to Have Balance

There’s a few weeks left until Orientation Week at McMaster University School of Medicine. Our start date may be August 24th, but preparation starts well before then. Since June, I’ve been filling out my health clearance forms, getting my vaccinations and TB tests completed, getting my background check, finishing pre-medical school modules….and the list goes on.

Four years later, I’ve graduated from UC Berkeley with a B.A. in Public Health. It’s been a roller coaster journey, but I can truly say I (mostly) enjoyed every moment of the ride. Despite late nights in Doe and Moffitt Libraries, downing countless energy drinks to stay awake, rushing to get on Telebears to enrol into the classes I needed, and constantly comparing myself to others to ensure I stacked up to the thousands of pre-meds that populated my alma mater, my life at Cal was pretty much perfect.

I say my life was perfect not because I never struggled – I definitely spent hours crying over my physics midterms and hours upon hours alone, studying for the MCAT. It was a struggle, but it was a balanced struggle. During my four years, I made sure to party, travel and socialize enough to keep my sanity.

Getting into medical school is just the beginning of a long journey. In undergrad, you fret over your grades in classes, striving to keep above that 3.7 GPA benchmark. You worry about your CV, your extracurriculars, your research, your ability to stand out from tens of thousands of other applicants. It seems like the odds are stacked against you, considering less than half of medical school applicants actually get in each year. 

And yet, I’m so glad that I understood studying had limits. I understood that you only go through college once. I understood that life is not just about getting to the next step, but rather enjoying and learning from the journey.

There are definitely nights where I planned to study, but ended up going to a party (or two). There are days that I should’ve spent holed up inside, but instead chose to go to a rave with my friends. There are midterms I could’ve been better prepared for, but people who were much more valuable to me than an A. In college, I traveled to over 20 countries, missed quite a bit of school because of it, and even more when I traveled for interviews. I had the privilege of volunteering in Peru, studying abroad in England at the London School of Economics and going to EDC Las Vegas, Beyond Wonderland, POP etc. etc. My experience in college was diverse, rewarding and absolutely unforgettable.

Maybe if I had studied harder I would’ve graduated with a higher GPA. Maybe if I had spent more time in lab I would have more publications. Maybe if I had worked more I would have saved up more money for medical school. But would I have regrets? Definitely.

Having applied to both Canadian and American schools, I can say without a doubt that the process sucks. From inception in college, when all the pre-meds are forced to compete with each other, to trying to check off all those boxes (leadership, volunteering, research etc), to taking the MCAT, to writing wayyyy too many secondaries to count. Sometimes you just have to forget about being perfect and live your life the way it was meant to be lived. You’ll still get to that coveted destination, I promise!

I feel so blessed to have gotten into one of my top choices for medical school BUT I feel ever luckier to have had one of the most amazing, unforgettable and exciting college experiences possible. My life has been so rich, from my friends, my family, and the risks I took.

All this being said, have fun in college. Get too drunk at a party, stay out too late, say yes when your friends want to go for late night cheesecake during exam week. Be yourself and find activities that you actually enjoy! I found my passion for healthcare-technology in college, and a desire to combine that passion with a deep interest in public health.

I look forward to my next adventure in medical school, I have full confidence that my next 3 years will be just as amazing as my 4 years at Cal!

If you’d like advice on medical school applications, or want to know more about applying to two systems simultaneously, feel free to contact me via email: gua1@mcmaster.ca or via Twitter: a_gu77

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UBC: Just finished my first MMI!

I can’t believe my first MMI is over! It seems like just yesterday I was booking my date and looking into airplane tickets (interview invitations were sent out on December 3rd for the early applicants). It was a little nerve-wracking, but I’m really glad I chose the 11:00 am slot. There were 3 slots each day, on Feb 7th, Feb 8th and Feb 21st and Feb 22nd. In total, I think about 600 people were interviewed based on how many people were there during my slot.

In my interview group, most people were from Canada (except me of course), there were people from Calgary, Toronto and UBC. It seemed that most people were a year out of college and had taken this past year to prepare their application and work. I would say it was about 40/60 (university seniors v. graduates). There was also a student who had already completed his masters in my group.

In terms of the actual stations, there were 11 in total and 1 rest station. We were told to go register between 40-25 minutes before our interview slot, but when I arrived there at 10 am, half of my group had already checked in . The medical school students who were helping out that day were really nice and friendly, and willing to answer any questions we might’ve had about the medical school. They couldn’t tell me too much about the new curriculum however, since they’re still on the old one, but currently, UBC has a systems based learning approach, where the first and second years are devoted to basic sciences, and the third and fourth are clinical.

At 10:40am, we were brought into the auditorium for a debrief and to calm our nerves. Then, at 11am, we were ushered into the area where we would go from station to station for an hour and forty minutes. I actually really enjoyed all the stations, you can find examples of what they might ask online (you sign a confidentiality agreement before you interview). There’s acting, addressing different scenarios, logic, ethics and more “fun” questions. The time went by quickly, and we were directed where to go after each station by the medical school student volunteers. You can tell when each station is over by the little bell that goes off in each room. It’s pretty subtle so for the first station, my interview and I just looked at each other to see if we had imagined it.

At 12:40, all the stations were complete and we were shuttled outside for a 14 minute break. This was time to use the bathroom, drink some water etc. Then, we entered another auditorium for the writing component, which was 30 minutes. You have do some analysis and demonstrate that you’re able to write at a college level. Nothing too difficult, it’s a lot like the English Provincial that everyone has to write in grade 12.

After the writing station, which was over at 1:37pm, we had the optional site preference presentation, and following that was the medical school tour. All in all, the interview takes about 4 hours with the interview, writing component and optional parts.

I actually had a great experience, everyone was friendly and helpful, and I didn’t feel confused at any point in the process. Good luck to anyone else who’s interviewing here, let me know if you have any questions!